Recordings

I am pleased to release various recordings of jazz standards for you to enjoy. For $1.00 you can download any recording to enjoy on your various mobile devices. All proceeds are used to promote life through an amazing charity that helps women and men transition into parenthood (White Rose). Enjoy great jazz and lend a helping hand to our brothers and sisters who desperately need our love and support.

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A Beautiful Friendship

A Beautiful Friendship
A Beautiful Friendship
This is the end of a beautiful friendship. It ended a moment ago. This is the end of a beautiful friendship. I know - 'Cause your eyes told me so. We've always been - Like sister and brother. Until tonight - When we looked at each other. That was the end of a beautiful friendship and just the beginning of love --- What more needs to be said, simply a wonderful melody and lyrics by Donald Kahn and Jule Styne.

Ain’t Misbehavin

Ain't Misbehavin
Ain't Misbehavin
Ain't Misbehavin' is a 1929 stride jazz/early swing composition played with a slow-to-moderate pace. With lyrics by Andy Razaf and score by Thomas "Fats" Waller and Harry Brooks, the number was created specifically as a theme song for the Razaf/Waller/Brooks off-Broadway musical comedy Connie's Hot Chocolates. In a 1941 interview with Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, Fats claimed the song was written while "lodging" in alimony prison, and that is why he was not "misbehaving".

Georgia On My Mind

Georgia on My Mind
Georgia on My Mind
"Georgia on My Mind" is a song by Hoagy Carmichael and Stuart Gorrell, now often associated with the version by Ray Charles, a native of Georgia, who recorded it for his 1960 album The Genius Hits the Road. It became the official state song of Georgia in 1979.

I’ve Grown Accustom To Her Face

I've Grown Accustomed To Her Face
I've Grown Accustomed To Her Face
"I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face" is a song from the 1956 musical My Fair Lady, with music by Frederick Loewe and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner. It was originally performed by Rex Harrison as Professor Henry Higgins. He also performed in the 1964 film version. The song expresses Professor Henry Higgins's rage at the fact that his pupil Eliza Doolittle has chosen to walk out of his life, and his growing realization of how much he will miss her.

Makin’ Whoopee

Makin' Whoopee
Makin' Whoopee
"Makin' Whoopee!" is a jazz/blues song, first popularized by Eddie Cantor in the 1928 musical Whoopee! Gus Kahn wrote the lyrics and Walter Donaldson composed the music for the song as well as for the entire musical. This is sheer fun to play - I hope you enjoy!

The Nearness of You

The Nearness of You
The Nearness of You
The song was performed in the Paramount film "Romance in the Dark"(1938) by the lead actress Gladys Swarthout of the Metropolitan Opera. A classic jazz standard and beautiful ballad.

Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace
Amazing Grace
"Amazing Grace" is a Christian hymn published in 1779, with words written by the English poet and Anglican clergyman John Newton (1725–1807). Newton wrote the words from personal experience. He grew up without any particular religious conviction, but his life's path was formed by a variety of twists and coincidences that were often put into motion by his recalcitrant insubordination. He was pressed (conscripted) into service in the Royal Navy, and after leaving the service, he became involved in the Atlantic slave trade. In 1748, a violent storm battered his vessel off the coast of County Donegal, Ireland, so severely that he called out to God for mercy, a moment that marked his spiritual conversion. The greatest love song of all times! I love playing this classic hymn with a gospel, Texas shuffle/blues/jazz feel. I hope you enjoy.

There Will Never Be Another You

There WIll Never Be Another You
There WIll Never Be Another You
"There Will Never Be Another You" is a popular song with music by Harry Warren and lyrics by Mack Gordon for the Twentieth Century Fox musical Iceland (1942) starring Sonja Henie and John Payne. The songs in the film featured Joan Merrill accompanied by Sammy Kaye and His Orchestra. The song was published in 1942, and is at least since the 1950s and Chet Baker's 1954 recording one of the widely known and performed standards of the jazz repertoire. Enjoy!

The Good Life

The Good Life
The Good Life
"The Good Life" (originally "La Belle Vie" in French) is a popular song by Sacha Distel and 1934 born composer Jack Reardon, published in 1962. It was featured in the movie Seven Capital Sins. The song is best known in the English-speaking world as a 1963 recording by Tony Bennett. He gained a number 18 hit on the U.S. pop singles chart with it; it also became one of his rarer UK Singles Chart hits, making it to number 27 there. "The Good Life" became one of Bennett's staple songs, and was featured on four of his top-selling albums, including 1994's MTV Unplugged: Tony Bennett and 2006's Duets: An American Classic.

Almost Like Being In Love

Almost Like Being In Love
Almost Like Being In Love
"Almost Like Being in Love" is a popular song published in 1947. The music was written by Frederick Loewe, and the lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner. The song was made popular by David Brooks and Marion Bell in the 1947 musical Brigadoon. It was later performed in the 1954 film version by Gene Kelly. There were three hit versions of the song in the United States in 1947. Frank Sinatra's version was the highest charting at #20. Mildred Bailey and Mary Martin both charted with the song at #21 that year. Nat King Cole recorded more than one version of the song, including a later version that was used as the closing song in the 1993 movie Groundhog Day which starred Bill Murray.

King Of The Road

King Of The Road
King Of The Road
"King of the Road" is a 1964 song written and originally recorded by country singer Roger Miller. The lyrics tell of the day-to-day life of a vagabond hobo who, despite being poor (a "man of means by no means"), revels in his freedom, describing himself humorously as the "king of the road". It was Miller's fifth single for Smash Records. How is it even possible to not enjoy this tune!

Over The Rainbow

Over The Rainbow
Over The Rainbow
"Over the Rainbow" (often referred to as "Somewhere over the Rainbow") is a ballad, with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by Yip Harburg. It was written for the movie The Wizard of Oz (1939) and was sung by actress Judy Garland, in her starring role as Dorothy Gale. The song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song and became Garland's signature song, as well as one of the most enduring standards of the 20th century. The song is number one on the "Songs of the Century" list compiled by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts. The American Film Institute also ranked "Over the Rainbow" the greatest movie song of all time on the list of "AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs".

These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)

These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You)
These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You)
"These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)" is a standard with lyrics by Eric Maschwitz and music by Jack Strachey. The song was not an immediate success and even Keith Prowse, Maschwitz's agent, refused to publish it, releasing the copyright to Maschwitz himself – a stroke of luck for the lyricist. Writing in 1957, he claimed to have made over $50,000 from the song! I hope you enjoy my rendition of this beautiful standard - one of my favorites!

Do You Know What It Means (To Miss New Orleans)

Do You Know What It Means (To Miss New Orleans)
Do You Know What It Means (To Miss New Orleans)
"Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans" is a song written by Eddie DeLange and Louis Alter, which was first heard in the movie New Orleans in 1947, where it was performed by Louis Armstrong and sung by Billie Holiday. I hope enjoy my version of this classic "Big Easy" tune - so sit back, put your feet up and unwind to some relaxing sounds of New Orleans.

Oh, You Crazy Moon

Oh, You Crazy Moon
Oh, You Crazy Moon
Here is a wonderful but obscure ballad/jazz standard by Jimmy Van Heusen, with lyrics by Johnny Burke. It's a fabulous tune that is hardly heard today (which is truly a shame!). Several jazz greats like Mel Torme (1960)have recorded it but my favorite is Frank Sinatra's version recorded in 1965. Take a listen to this classic - it will become one of your favorites too - enjoy!

On The Sunny Side Of The Street

On The Sunny Side Of The Street
On The Sunny Side Of The Street
"On the Sunny Side of the Street" is a 1930 song, with credited music composed by Jimmy McHugh and lyrics by Dorothy Fields. Some authors say that Fats Waller was actually the composer, but he sold the rights for the money. It was introduced in the Broadway musical Lew Leslie's International Revue, starring Harry Richman and Gertrude Lawrence. Having become a jazz standard, it has been played and recorded by such greats as Louis Armstrong, Ted Lewis, Dave Brubeck, Earl Hines, Benny Goodman, Lionel Hampton, Erroll Garner, Dizzy Gillespie, Art Tatum, James Booker, Count Basie and Lester Young. Likewise, leading vocalists, including Billie Holiday, Dinah Washington, Ella Fitzgerald, Judy Garland, Doris Day, Keely Smith, Nat King Cole, Jo Stafford, Frank Sinatra, and Willie Nelson enjoyed performing and recording it as well. Arguably the best known arrangement is found in the 1945 record by Tommy Dorsey and the Sentimentalists. It continues to be recorded in the 21st century, showing up not just on recordings but on movie soundtracks, such as the 2007 film The Good Life, and on Broadway, such as 2013–14's musical revue After Midnight. I hope you enjoy my version of this classic!

Till There Was You

Till There Was You
Till There Was You
"Till There Was You" is a song written by Meredith Willson for his 1957 musical play The Music Man, and which also appeared in the 1962 movie version. The song is sung by librarian Marian Paroo (Barbara Cook on Broadway, Shirley Jones in the film) to Professor Harold Hill (portrayed by Robert Preston) toward the end of Act Two. It became a hit for Anita Bryant in 1959, reaching number 30 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and spending two weeks at number 14 on Cash Box. "Till There Was You" was later covered by the Beatles in 1963. I hope you enjoy my funky little arrangement of this wonderful tune!

Am I Blue

Am I Blue
Am I Blue
"Am I Blue?" is a song written by Harry Akst and Grant Clarke in 1929, and was a big hit that year for Ethel Waters in the movie On with the Show. It has become a standard and has been covered by numerous artists. My favorite rendition is the one and only Mr. Ray Charles (youtu.be/U6ZFDeqav1Q).

Let’s Get Away From It All

Let's Get Away From It All
Let's Get Away From It All
"Let's Get Away from It All" is a popular song with music by Matt Dennis and lyrics by Tom Adair, published in 1941. The song is most commonly associated with Frank Sinatra (who recorded it while he was a part of Tommy Dorsey's orchestra and later for his Come Fly with Me album), but many others have recorded it and it is considered a standard of traditional pop music. Hope you enjoy my fun rendition of this great tune!

What A Difference A Day Makes

What A Difference A Day Makes
What A Difference A Day Makes
“What a Diff’rence a Day Made” is a popular song originally written in Spanish by María Grever, a Mexican songwriter, in 1934 with the title, “Cuando vuelva a tu lado” (“When I Return to Your Side”). The song is also known in English as “What a Difference a Day Makes”, as popularized by Dinah Washington. The English lyrics were written by Stanley Adams, and was played by Harry Roy & his Orchestra. It was published in late 1934. The most successful early recording, in 1934, was by the Dorsey Brothers, although it was first recorded in English by Cleveland crooner Jimmie Ague. Love this tune - hope you enjoy!